Window Tinting

 
 
 

Illegal Or Dark Tinted Windows

Apr 2 2015

Want to tint your truck or car? We can do that!

Want illegal tint on your vehicle?

We can do that too, but we won’t.

Tint that is 34% or darker is illegal in MO and KS unless you have a medical waiver of some kind. If you want your tint darker than the legal limit of 35% you are completely and solely responsible.

We don’t offer tint darker than 20% on the front door windows and we don’t tint windshields other than eyebrows. That includes “stacking” lighter tint to make the end result darker.

Keep in mind that anything under 35% is illegal in Kansas and Missouri and you may get a ticket if you get pulled over. Cops don’t really like when they can’t see inside your front windows. And usually for good reason. But the ticket you get won’t be good or cheap. If you choose to go with 20% on the front windows and get pulled over, you could be told to pull it off right there in front of the officer. Wouldn’t be the first time that’s happened.

The good thing is, even when you stay within legal limits of tint on your windows, tint can look and work awesome. Darker windows look good from outsiders by giving your windows the same shade and look. From the inside, tinted windows offer protection to your eyes from the sun. It’ll also help protect your upholstery, dash and other interior parts from the harsh UV rays. Another thing even legal tint is good for is privacy. You are allowed to go darker on any door or window that is behind the driver’s door so that offers even more privacy in the rear seats of your vehicle.

Tint is a great addition to your vehicle whether you’ve got all the latest gadgets and accessories or you like staying with the factory look. Even factory windows are coming tinted these days. If your factory vehicle isn’t tinted dark enough for your liking, we can help you out with that, as long as it’s still within the legal limits.

Come on over to Chux Trux Tint Shop today to get your windows tinted by the best in Kansas City.


 
 
 

Choosing the Best Window Tint Shop

Feb 10 2014

 Window Tints on car 

It’s 90 degrees outside, not a cloud in the sky, you’re stuck in traffic, the sun is beating in through the windows, and your car’s A/C is doing all it can but you’re still starting to feel like a baked potato!

On a warm summer day temperatures inside a parked car can reach as high as 140 degrees. That’s high enough to harm the electronics, dry out and crack leather and vinyl, not to mention the color damage and fading from the UV rays of the sun.

You need to get your windows tinted!

There are a number of benefits to having your vehicle’s windows tinted:

  • Window tint can drop interior temperatures in your car by as much as 60%
  • Window tinting blocks harmful UV-A and UV-B rays of the sun by as much as 90%
  • In a serious crash, the window film can actually help hold the shattered glass together
  • There will be reduced glare from the sun making driving much safer with tinted windows, not to mention it’s easier on the eyes
  • Tinting your windows increases the efficiency of your air conditioning system which can help you get better fuel mileage
  • There will be much less sun damage that causes cracking and aging of your vinyl and leather
  • You will have more privacy in your car so you can do. . .huh, we’ll leave that up to you
  • And hey, it can also make your car look all stealthy and cool and stuff

So okay, you’ve decided to get your windows tinted, now what? How do you decide where to go?

In any major metropolitan area like Kansas City, there are numerous shops that will do the job for you, picking the one that’s right for the job is the trick.

One of the best ways is through word of mouth. Ask your friends where they got their window tinting done. Were they satisfied with the work? Was the job done in a professional manner?

Another factor is reputation.  Has the company been in business 15 years or more?  They don't stay in business by doing bad work.  Look at online reviews as well as asking your friends. What is said about them online? 

Once you’ve got a shop or two in mind, call them, ask them how how busy they are.  Good shops are almost always busy, but will get you in within a day or two.   Go visit their shop and see how well it's cared for.  Better yet, watch them for 20 minutes while they do an install. Do they take steps to protect the customers car or truck while tinting their windows?

One other thing to consider before you tint is the local and state laws. The laws regarding car tint or window film vary from state to state, sometimes from locality to locality, and they are usually different for a car than for a mini-van, SUV, or motor home. The window tint professionals at Chux Tint Shop keep up on all this sort of stuff so you don’t have to.

The quality of the film used can make a huge difference in, not only how the job looks, but how long the film will last. Chux will stand behind their products and workmanship 100% and offer a lifetime guarantee so you can sure you will be completely satisfied when you leave our shop.

As you can see, there are many things to consider when choosing the best window tinting shop. For window tinting in the Kansas City area, you can call the professionals at Chux Tint Shop (813-373-0593) in Independence and they can answer all of your questions about pricing, types of films, how long the job will take, and more. Don’t worry, you won’t have to talk to a machine or go through one of those annoying phone menus. You will get a real live human being who is a window tinting expert.

You can also stop by Chux Tint Shop any time Monday thru Friday 9:00 - 5:30 and Saturday 9:00 - 3:00. Compare us to any other shop in town and if you like what you see, (and we’re sure you will) we can set you up with an appointment. But if you hit us at a time when we don’t happen to be tinting another vehicle, we can do the job right on the spot.

So, if you’re looking for Kansas City window tinting, the best tint shop in the entire Kansas City area is Chux! Bring us anything with glass you can drive, push, or drag in to the shop. Cars, trucks, SUVs, limos, boats, and buses. You bring it in, we’ll tint it!

 

By: Chris Ripper


 
 
 

Top 6 Reasons to Add Window Tint

Feb 5 2014

 Window tint on truck window

Applying auto window tint is a pretty inexpensive way to really improve the look of your car, truck, SUV or Jeep.  Depending on the density or color you can get a really sporty look, or make it look slick and expensive without breaking your bank.  Even though it looks awesome, there are many other reasons that tinting your car windows is a great idea:

 

  1. Reduces Interior Heat- How many times have you jumped into your vehicle in summer and burnt your assets on a hot seatbelt or leather seats?  By tinting your windows you can reduce the interior heat of your vehicle by up to 60% which will lower the risk of burning yourself, and cut down on arriving somewhere sweaty and hot. Window tint makes your car, truck or SUV more comfortable, plain and simple.
  2. UV Protection- The sun's ultra-violet rays are really damaging and cause cracking and fading of your vehicle's interior.  Auto window tint cuts down on these harmful rays and reduces the damage to your vehicle.  
  3. Protect Yourself- Just as the sun's UV rays damage the interior of your vehicle, it can damage you too.  Reducing the amount of UV you are exposed to will help reduce aging, lower skin damage and even help protect you against skin cancer. Not only will your truck look hot, you will too!
  4. Shatter Resistant Glass- Did you know that using auto window tint can help make the glass in your vehicle more shatter resistant?  Since the film covers the inside of the glass, in the event of a collision or a blow to the glass, the film helps keep the pieces of glass from shattering and being thrown at you and your passengers.  This is a pretty good safety feature that many people don't realize window tinting provides.
  5. Safer Driving- Having quality auto window tint installed drastically cuts down on the sun's glare when you're driving.  You've had it happen, driving up a hill and all of a sudden when you hit the peak, the suns glare blasts your eyes and blinds you temporarily.  This can be pretty dangerous but tinting your windows can stop this from happening and keep you driving more safely.
  6. Better Privacy- When you apply 5% auto window tint (never go darker than what your state allows) you can enjoy greater privacy.  Let's face it, sometimes it would be great to cruise around without being on display, like when you're in a bad area, or have someone in your ride that you'd rather not be seen!  Since it stops people from being able to see into your truck or Jeep very well, you don't have to try to hide your valuables every time you lock up your vehicle either.  This can cut down on the risk of break in’s and property loss. You should note that tint this dark is just one option. 5% tint or “limo tint” is the only tint that is this dark.  All other shades of tint allow you to see into the vehicle.

If you're trying to decide on auto window tint for your truck or Jeep you now have a lot of good reasons to support your decision.  When you look at all of the safety benefits, and how much it protects the interior of your vehicle, just those alone more than justify the cost of the tinting.

More important even than the cost savings that auto window tint can bring you is the awesome look it can add to your vehicle.  With all of the tint options available you can pick out a look that will make your vehicle really stand out from all the rest.  There are a lot of different colors available so you can choose to go for a sporty look with a color that matches your vehicle, or you can go for a classier look with dark or even silvery tint types.  

 

Many people with extended cab, crew cab trucks or SUV’s don’t realize the back doors and window already have tint from the factory so those windows are a different color than the front windows.  It’s really obvious if you stand back and look.  By tinting the front doors you dramatically improve the overall look of the vehicle.


When you're ready to pick out your auto window tint, make sure to go for high quality.  If you go with a cheap version to try to save money you'll regret it in the long run because it doesn't last as long and eventually changes from the grey to more of a purple.  Consider getting your tinting installed professionally by Chux Trux so you'll have a job that looks like it was done at the factory.

By: Chris Ripper


 
 
 

How Window Tinting Works

Feb 5 2014

How dark is 20 percent window tint?

Whether you're a Mafia Don or a Hollywood star, a nice window-tinting job on your limo provides privacy and prestige, both of which go a long way in promoting your public persona.  If you're just a regular Joe or Josie, though, with no real public persona to protect, quality window tinting on your car, truck, van or SUV brings a list of benefits you're sure to appreciate too, besides the fact that it just looks cool.  It must, of course, be a quality job to promote the desired effect, with "quality" here referring to both the installation process and the materials used.

When you think about it, few automotive aftermarket products deliver as many tangible benefits as a good window tinting.  Most obvious among these is the protection of your privacy – especially important to those who get a thrill from driving around naked or engaging in any number of illicit activities while on the road.  Privacy isn't only important to Mafia Dons and Hollywood stars either, and besides, it might be good therapy to be able to flip off the jerk that just cut you off, knowing he can't see what you're doing.  That way you can get your feelings out without promoting violent road rage on his part.

 

Other Good Reasons To Tint

Privacy aside, another important benefit of vehicle window tinting is the way it cuts down on the glare.  Window tint is made from very thin polyester that has been treated with various metals and dyes to get the desired color, shade and light-altering characteristics.  Some tint film is designed to reflect a certain amount of light while others are made to absorb light more than reflect it.

This all plays a part in determining how the characteristics of sunlight are changed as it enters your vehicle.  Cutting down the glare makes driving easier, safer and more comfortable, especially when the sun is low in the sky and might otherwise be the cause of another one of those splitting, rush-hour traffic headaches.

Speaking of comfortable, not only is the sun's glare cut down by a good quality window tinting but the car 's temperature stays considerably cooler and more comfortable too.  This can add to your well-being, and not only when driving either.  When you park your car somewhere on a hot day, window tinting will keep the interior considerably cooler.  That way it won't get like a baker's oven inside, which makes it better for you and better for your car's interior too.  The seats, dashboard and carpets won't age as quickly when they're protected from the sun's rays by tinted windows. 

 

Why it Works So Well

A good tint blocks out a certain percentage of direct sunlight from invading your space and also stops infrared (IR) and ultra-violet light (UV) too.  This is basically what a high-quality pair of sunglasses does for your eyes, although in this case, it's like putting a pair of top-quality shades on your entire car or truck.  This will help protect your skin from the sun's harmful rays.  People fork over big bucks for those little bottles of SPF (whatever number) sunscreen to get the same results that you'll automatically have every time you're behind the wheel.  All of your passengers get the same treatment, of course.

Unlike wearing sunglasses, however, which would impair your ability to see well enough to drive at night if you were to wear them after sundown, window tinting is primarily designed to cut down glare coming in from the outside, not to hamper your ability to see clearly from the inside.  Tinted windows actually help make nighttime driving easier and safer too because it helps cut down the glare produced from oncoming headlights.  It's all good.

 

Technically Speaking

Clear, non-tinted window glass on a vehicle typically allows about 90 percent of visible light to enter the cabin.  The reason it's not 100 percent is because about five percent is reflected and about five percent is absorbed.  Window tinting is designed to block a certain, specific percentage of visible light, with darker tints blocking more light.  It will also block a specified amount of ultra violet and infra red light as well – which are parts of the light spectrum known to cause skin cancer and also to create heat buildup inside a vehicle.

The polyester tinting film used in window tinting is applied to the inside of the window glass after it's been thoroughly cleaned.  It's glued in place, cut to fit exactly and smoothed to remove all wrinkles and/or bubbles.  A cheap tinting material or an unprofessional application will generally scream out the truism, "You get what you pay for."  Nothing looks cheesier than a nice car with a bad tint job, except maybe a senior citizen with a bad dye job!      

 

 


 
 
 

How to Remove Window Tint

Feb 4 2014

Removing window tint

It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to know that car window tinting is a great way to add to a car’s cool looks as well as provide protection from heat and UV rays. However, there comes a time when it all has to go. Whether you want to change the way your car looks, replace badly worn tint or comply with your state’s window tinting laws, chances are you want it gone. Fortunately, it doesn’t take much to remove your car’s current tint job. All it takes is a few items, a warm, sunny day and a little patience.

Why Get Rid of Tint?

There are plenty of good reasons for car owners to ditch their car window tinting. Over time, certain types of window tint can turn purple or fade, especially if it happens to be budget-grade tint made with non-metallic dyes. Bubbles can also form underneath the tint, but that’s usually found on improperly installed window tint. Scratches, nicks and other flaws can leave tint looking old and ragged – that’s reason enough to ditch it for something better.

Maybe you’ve bought a used car that came with window tint that’s seen better days or perhaps it’s too dark or the wrong color. Just because you’ve bought someone else’s ride doesn’t mean you have to be stuck with their old tint. Also, if you’ve moved to another state with stricter car window tint laws, chances are you want to avoid a fix-it ticket by going with a lighter shade that meets the legal requirements. Or maybe you just want a darker shade of tint that offers better privacy and a cooler look.

What You’ll Need

You don’t have to worry about grabbing any special equipment for this job. All you need are a few common items you can buy from almost any store or even find around the house:

  • Bottle of soapy water
  • Glass cleaner
  • Razor blade
  • Undiluted ammonia
  • Face mask
  • Super-fine steel wool (4-aught or “0000” grade)
  • Black trash bags

It usually takes around 3 hours to completely remove your window tint, but it might take a bit longer if this is your first time at it. You’ll definitely need to do this on a nice, hot and sunny day for the best results.

How to Remove Tint

The first thing you’ll want to do is cut out a couple of window-shaped pieces from the black trash bags. Spray the soapy water solution on the outside of the window and place one of the pieces flat against the window. The black trash bag will trap heat between the window and the tint film, making it much easier to peel off in one go.

Next, go inside the car and cover up as much of the interior as you can with a tarp or some cloth. Grab the ammonia and spray the entire interior surface of the window. At this point, you might want to wear your face mask – undiluted ammonia is some powerful stuff and the odor can overcome just about anyone. Immediately afterwards, place the second piece cut from the black trash bag against the window.

Leave both pieces on the window for about an hour. The combination of ammonia and heat will soften the tint adhesive and make it easier to peel off. You might want to leave your car out in the sun while your wait. After the hour’s up, you can finally get to work peeling off the old film.

Start by gently lifting one corner of the window tint with your fingernail or a razor blade. If possible, work to peel away the car window tinting in one move. Use the undiluted ammonia to keep the tint soft as you work and be careful around the window defroster lines if you’re starting from the rear windshield. Keep going until the tint is completely removed.

Use the undiluted ammonia and the super-fine steel wool to get rid of any leftover adhesive. Wipe the inside of the window clean with a dry paper towel when you’re done. At this point, all you’ll need to do is remove the black trash bag and wipe the outside of the window down with some glass cleaner and a dry cloth or paper towel.

The Bottom Line

Removing your own car window tinting is a remarkably easy job that just about anyone can do. But if you’re pressed for time or if you aren’t feeling great about removing tint on your own, you can always turn to a professional tint shop. It’s expensive (up to $200 for most cars), but the great thing about having it done at a shop is the option of having the pros apply new car window tinting the same day.  

 

By: Chris Ripper

 
 
 

What Does Window Tint Cost?

Feb 4 2014

car windows tintedLet’s face it – great tint doesn’t come for free and unless you’re planning on installing your own tint (bad idea), chances are you’ll pay to have your tint professionally installed. Depending on what you ultimately want, you could find yourself paying top dollar for high-end tint or end up with a great value in a more economical line of window film.

How Much Should You Pay?

When it comes to paying for tint, there’s really no concrete yardstick to rely on. You can find discount window tinting at some lesser-known tint shops for as low as $100, but you’ll end up getting exactly what you’ve paid for in most cases. If you’re planning to go all-out on your window tint, you might end up paying upwards to $450 or even more for a luxury tint job. But in the Midwest, high end tint isn't usually needed.  In the end, it really depends on the kind of tint you want and the options you want to go with. As with any other type of car customization, there are plenty of factors that can affect how much you pay for window tinting:

1. Car Type

Some cars are easier to apply tint to, while others can be a pain to tint. For instance, cars with curved or steep rear windows demand a lot of work and as a result, demand a steeper price. Cars with complex window shapes take a lot of work to cover and cars with lots of window surface area need more film to cover. Both can easily raise the price of an average tint job and it’s why sedans are usually cheaper to tint than SUVs and CUVs.

A reputable tint shop will ask about the type of vehicle you want tinted and give you an estimate of how long it’ll take and how much you can expect to pay. Don’t be afraid to shop around for the best prices, but make sure you know exactly what you are getting, and maybe more importantly, how reputable is the shop you are dealing with

 

2. Film Type

Quality and pricing usually go together when it comes to window tinting. Polyester dye-infused tints are common for entry-level use and they’re pretty inexpensive to boot, but you’ll end up with a basic aftermarket look. Higher-end tints use a variety of materials, including carbon and ceramic, to give off more of a factory-installed look. Fully-metallized films like SolarGard HP are ideal for anyone looking at high-quality tint.

Keep in mind that low-cost tint usually looks good for the first few years, but it’s prone to becoming discolored and bubbles may also form as it ages. Mid-level and high-end window tinting may seem like a fortune to some, but it’ll last much longer and you won’t have to worry about having it redone years later.

Another thing to consider is the type of heat protection that window tint offers, especially in regions with warm weather. You might need a greater amount of protection from heat and UV rays in warm weather climates than you’d need in more temperate regions. Experts recommend at least 30% heat protection for tints in moderate climates and at least 45 to 50% heat protection in areas where temperatures reach 90 degrees Fahrenheit on a regular basis. Entry-level tints offer 10 to 20% protection from heat while high-end films offer 80% or more.

3. Warranty

In most cases, you’ll have the option of going with two types of warranties:

Manufacturer’s warranty – This warranty allows the manufacturer to take care of tint defects such as discoloration, but it won’t cover defects that are the installer’s fault (bubbling, peeling, etc.). The warranty on window tint  usually covers the film for 1, 3 and 5-year periods, although it’s not uncommon for manufacturers to offer lifetime warranty coverage.

Installer’s warranty – The installer is responsible for taking care of bubbling, peeling and other tint defects that come from the installation process. Usually available at additional cost and only covers the installation. The installer’s warranty should be combined with window tint that offers a lifetime warranty for the best benefit.

4. Reputation

The best window tinting shops are capable of performing high-quality work that meets and exceeds customer expectations, but these shops don’t come cheap. Likewise, lesser known shops that offer bargain prices for window tint aren’t always known for their quality work or for using quality tint.  It's always safer to do business with a shop who’s been in business continually for 10 years or more.   Many shops have installers with 10 years of experience, but most businesses fail in the first 5 years.  Make sure that the actual business has been around for a while, and not just the installer. 

The Bottom Line

At the end of the day, it’s all about how much you’re willing to pay for a job well done. Budget window tinting with a basic lifetime warranty and done by a reputable tint shop usually costs between $150 and $180 for a compact, 2 door car. Mid-range tint jobs usually cost from $180 to $255, while high-end window tinting can run anywhere from $250 to $450 and beyond. Some shops offer specials on tint for as low as $80, but it’s “buyer beware” when it comes to cheap tint.  Remember, you get what you pay for! In short, do your homework and seek out the best tint shop your budget can handle.

Let’s not forget what two famous American’s have taught us previously, “Price is what you pay. Value is what you get” (Warren Buffet).  And Benjamin Franklin was quoted as saying, “The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten”.   These quotes hold true especially when it comes to buying something that is mostly about the skill of the installer and the reputation and commitment of the company providing the service.

By: Chris Ripper


 
 
 

What Type of Window Tint is Best for my Truck or Car?

Feb 4 2014

Window Tint

Auto window tint offers car owners many benefits including privacy, upholstery protection, safety from glaring sun and keeping cool in the summer months, but let’s be honest, it just looks cool. Before you and “a guy you know” go to the local auto parts store and dive into a DIY project, it’s important to understand the different types of window tinting. 

It’s like anything else, if you want to do the job right; you need the right materials installed the right way. 

What the numbers mean and how dark is too dark?

A good first step to take before the auto window tint shopping begins is to understand your state’s laws. Click here to see our article on window tint laws.  If your tint is too dark, you’ll pay for the ticket and the cost to have it removed. Tint shades are measured in units called visible light transmittance or VLT. It is a percentage of light that is visible from the outside looking in. When you’re shopping you may notice products that allow 5%, 10%, 35% and more. It’s simple, the higher the percentage the lighter the film. 

How window tinting is produced

All window tint includes polyester film and thicknesses that vary from 2 to 7 millimeters. The surface in contact with the window is made with a water-activated or pressure sensitive coating that adheres to the window. The outer surface is a tough, scratch-resistant finish. 

Three manufacturing technologies used to produce window film:

Dyed Film 
Dyed film absorbs heat. Now, it seems like that would cause the interior of a vehicle to only get hotter, but it actually helps the heat escape. The heat transfers to the glass from the film and then dissipates outward with airflow sweeping past the window. Some heat will get into the vehicle on still days, but on most days, there is more than enough air movement to keep that heat moving away. 

Deposited Film 
This film is made by depositing a metal onto the film. Deposited film offers stellar protection at a low cost, but the applications for this type of product are limited because it is thicker. The end result is a darker and more reflective tint. This type of window tint is often called metallic window tint or film.  (Note: metallic films have a notorious reputation for interfering with radio and GPS reception.  For this reason, Chux doesn’t sell this type of tint).

Spluttering Film 
A spluttering film is much lighter, thinner and can be used in a number of applications. Whatever type of rays you’re looking to block, this stuff can handle it. You can add a nice mirror effect, color shifting, and it provides excellent heat absorption while reflecting that nasty radiation. 

Not surprisingly, spluttering film is expensive due to a complex production process that involves atomic manipulation. Yes, really smart people figured out how to shake atoms loose and spread them on the film’s surface. What you need to know is that spluttering film is the Cadillac of window tinting. That ’78 Pinto is not worthy. 

Shopping smart 
Auto window tint will make your car or truck look and feel great, but it can make that sweet ride look like a clunker if you skimp on quality or have a knucklehead install it. Understanding the different grades of window tinting and asking questions prior to installation will keep your ride looking good.

One thing we should point out is that higher end films are great and do an excellent job at what they are designed for.  But what are they designed for? Dealing with the intensity and frequency of sun and heat you get in places like Phoenix, Houston and Miami and other southern states, that's what.   If you live in the Midwest, like we do here in Kansas City, a good basic tint is really all you need.

 

Quality grades of window tint 

All that techie information above basically feeds into six different grades of auto window tint. 

Economy film or one-ply film is really low-end, low-performing garbage. You and your buddy probably tried to slap some of this on a car when you were in high school and it then turned purple after six months. 

Standard film or two-ply film is a little bit better, but it won’t last long. You will notice fading in less than two years and the heat rejection is not good. 

First generation carbon offers more color stability, but the heat rejection still isn’t good. Some new car owners prefer this to metalized films because of occasional interference with electronic components. 

High performance two-ply films perform much better due to a layer of metal. The color is stable, and it rejects heat with severe prejudice. 

The metal in all metal film rejects heat and it won’t fade. It’s good stuff. 

Metal free film with nano particles takes us back into the space age. The superior color stability comes from true carbon construction, and it won’t cause that pesky electronic interference we mentioned above. Navigation systems, keyless entry, iPhones and remote starters will function just fine. 

OK, so this is a little more complicated than it appears. The key to having auto window tint or any upgrade installed lies in the hands of the installer. Ask plenty of questions and educate yourself before you shop.   

 

By: Chris Ripper


 
 
 

How Long Does it Take to Install Window Tint?

Feb 4 2014

 

Installing window tintOne of the most frequent questions we get about window tinting is "How long does it take to do it?"

Whether you go the DIY route or if you take your car to a reputable tint shop, car window tinting takes time and patience to have installed – there’s simply no way around it. Adding car window tint requires careful attention to detail and procedures for the best results. Rushing the process can easily leave you with bubbled, peeling and misshapen tint that looks ugly and amateurish, so it pays to take it slow.  

The amount of time it takes to add great-looking tint to your ride can vary thanks to a variety of reasons. The following offers a little insight on how long the average tint job takes as well as why some jobs take so long.     

How Long Will It Take?

The time it takes to finish a car window tinting job depends on several factors, including the type of vehicle, the amount of window surface area the installer has to work with, whether old tint has to be removed before hand, and the amount of time needed to deal with complex window shapes. Also, the more windows that must be tinted, the longer the job will take. It’s why SUVs and CUVs take longer to do than sedans.

On the average four-door sedan, it can take anywhere between one-and-a-half to two hours. On cars with lots of glass surface area, steep window rake or complex curves, it could take two hours or more. Cars like the Corvette can take a while to tint, especially on liftback models featuring the domed rear window. Two-door coupes can also take longer than normal to tint, since there isn’t much room for installers to work in the back seat with when tinting the rear window.

If your car already has tinted windows, the old tint and any adhesive used to hold it in place has to come off before the installer can add the new film. That could add two hours or more to a car window tint installation. It also depends on the quality and speed of the tint shop – some shops can get the job done right in under two hours while other shops take a bit longer.

Drying Time

People tend to forget that not only does window tint take time to install, but it also takes time to dry out the moisture left in the tint film. Ideally, window tint should be installed during the summer months under sunny weather, since it gives the tint a better chance to dry quickly, or at least in a temperature controlled tint shop. Under these circumstances, it usually takes two to three days to completely cure. In colder weather, it can take up to several weeks for tint to completely dry.

Machine Cut vs. Hand Cut

Some tint films come pre-cut from the manufacturer for an assortment of vehicles. At first glance, it seems convenient enough and it saves DIYers the work of trimming window tint to shape. Nevertheless, pre-cut windows from the manufacturer won’t be as accurately cut as tint that’s cut and trimmed at a professional tint shop.

Some shops use machines to cut tint to the exact shape needed for your windows. Machine-cut tint cuts down the amount of time it takes for the average tint installation while offering a reasonable amount of quality. However, nothing can beat the quality offered by hand-cut tint. A seasoned professional with a steady hand can cut your tint to match your windows exactly without worry about stretching or other tactics to make pre-cut or machine-cut tint fit properly.

What about Mobile Installation?

A lot of people think mobile installation for car window tinting is convenient – why think otherwise when the window tint shop can come to you? However, car window tinting requires a controlled environment for the best installation. Microscopic dust and debris can get trapped between the window and the tint during a mobile installation. Seeing dust trapped underneath your new car window tint is the last thing you’d want to see, which is why mobile installation isn’t always a good idea.  Think about how it looks when it's trapped under the protective film of your smartphone.  If you don't like it there you'll like it even less on your car.

Things to Consider

There’s plenty to consider when it comes to car window tinting, especially if you’re looking for an outstanding professional window tint job that’s done in a reasonable amount of time:

  • How long has the tint shop been in business? Longevity isn’t everything when it comes to a job well done, but if the tint shop’s been in business for a while, it must be doing something right to satisfy customers.
  • Does it offer high-quality tint film? Any business can cut corners by cheapening out on product, but it always shows at the end. Make sure the tint shop uses high-quality tint for its installations.
  • Does the shop offer a warranty on installations? Mistakes can happen and they often result in bubbling and peeling. Always make sure the shop offers a warranty to cover reinstallation if that happens.


Keeping all of these things in mind will help you choose the best window tint shop in Kansas City or wherever you happen to live.

 

By: Chris Ripper


 
 
 

Window Tint Laws for Missouri & Kansas

Feb 4 2014

Window Tint LawsWant to know the Missouri window tint law or the Kansas window tint laws?  These laws are more lenient in some states than others. These laws are there to prevent people from tinting their windows too dark and causing an obstruction of the drivers view, but more importantly, they are designed to protect law enforcement officers. Tinting your car's windows is not anything new, but it is one of the most inexpensive ways to “pimp your ride.”

 

Knowing the window tint laws in your area can save you from getting an expensive ticket or even worse. If you are pulled over and your windows are too dark, the officer can make you remove the tint right on the side of the road. Then you're out the cash replacing your tint with the legal limit, or worse, going back to no tint with tons of glare, faded interiors and all the other reasons you installed tint in the first place. The most commonly known law about window tinting has got to be the one that regulates just how dark you are allowed to tint your windows. This is measured by (Visible Light Transmission) or VLT. This is the percentage of light is allowed to pass through the film that is installed on the windows, creating the dark color.

 

Although they are quite similar, the window tint laws vary from state to state. Window tint laws are pretty much the same in Kansas and Missouri. For instance, Missouri, as well as Kansas, allow any color of tint and require outside mirrors if there is tint on your back windows. Both states also allow a maximum VLT of only 35% on the front side windows (front seat windows), but allow you to tint any windows behind the driver as dark as you want. The laws state that you can only tint the top four inches of your windshield which is also referred to as the manufacturers AS-1 or approved safety line. Manufacturers of the window tinting film are not required by law to certify that the tint film that they are producing meets the legal safety requirements. These states do not currently require a sticker to verify that your window tint is legal. You are also allowed to tint your windows with colored window tinting film (which requires a complicated process of dying the tinting film before applying it to your windows) that will turn the filtered light that is coming through the film to whatever color that the film is colored.

 

If you have a medical condition that requires you to tint your vehicles windows beyond the 35 percent that these states allow, in Missouri you can acquire a permit that will allow you to have this tint applied legally. To obtain this permit you must have a prescription from your doctor that states your medical condition and the reason for your need for this tint. Once you have this prescription you need to take it to your local highway patrol headquarters, where they will issue a permit and sticker for this tint. You will be required by window tint laws to apply the stickers on the front and rear windshields or bumper and keep the permit in the vehicle at all times. With this permit any licensed driver in your immediate family is able to drive that vehicle. Kansas however, does not have these medical exemptions. Unlike the state law in Missouri, Kansas doesn't require you to have a safety inspection. Although it is not required, unlike the Missouri laws, Kansas doesn't allow drivers to apply metallic or mirrored window tint. Red or amber tint is prohibited by Kansas law as well.

 

Here’s the current limits as of the time this article was written.  Check with your local authorities prior to purchasing window tint film to make sure your vehicle will be legal.


STATE

FRONT SIDES

REAR SIDES

BACK WINDOW

VISOR

AL

32%

32%

32%

6

AK

70%

40%

40%

5

AZ

33%

ANY%

ANY%

AS1

AR

25%

25%

10%

5

CA

70%

ANY%

ANY%

4

CO*

27%

27%

27%

4

CO*

NO%

ANY%

ANY%

4

CT

35%

35%

ANY%

AS1

DE

70%

ANY%

ANY%

AS1

FL

28%

15%

15%

AS1

GA

32%

32%

32%

6

HI

35%

35%

35%

4

ID

35%

20%

35%

AS1

IL

NO

ANY%

ANY%

6

IN

30%

30%

30%

AS1

IA

70%

ANY%

ANY%

AS1

KS

35%

35%

35%

AS1

KY

35%

18%

18%

AS1

LA

40%

25%

12%

AS1

MA

35%

35%

35%

6

ME

50%

50%

50%

4

MD

35%

35%

35%

5

MI

?

ANY%

ANY%

4

MN

50%

50%

50%

NO

MO

35%

ANY%

ANY%

AS1

MS

35%

35%

35%

AS1

MT

35%

20%

20%

AS1

NE

35%

20%

20%

AS1 OR 5

NV

35%

ANY%

ANY%

AS1

NH

NO

35%

35%

6

NJ

NO

ANY%

ANY%

NO

NM

20%

20%

20%

AS1 OR 5

NY

70%

70%

ANY%

6

NC

35%

35%

35%

AS1

ND

50%

ANY%

ANY%

70%

OH

50%

ANY%

ANY%

70%

OK

25%

25%

25%

AS1 OR 5

OR

35%

35%

35%

6

PA

70%

70%

70%

NO

RI

70%

70%

70%

AS1

SC

27%

27%

27%

AS1

SD

35%

20%

20%

AS1

TN

35%

35%

35%

AS1

TX

25%

25%

ANY%

AS1 OR 5

UT

43%

ANY%

ANY%

AS1

VT

NO

ANY%

ANY%

AS1

VA

50%

35%

35%

AS1

WA

35%

35%

35%

6

WV

35%

35%

35%

5

WI

50%

35%

35%

AS1

WY

28%

28%

28%

AS1 OR 5

 

By: Chris Ripper


 
 
 

How to Choose a Window Tint Shop

Feb 3 2014

Window Tinting Shop Kansas City

Finding a reputable shop is one of the most important aspects of car window tinting. After all, you want one that’s capable of getting the job done right the first time. When it comes to professionally applied window tint, the last thing you want to deal with is a botched job that takes time, effort and money to have corrected. It all comes down to asking your tint shop the right questions before making a final decision.  

Questions to Ask

Before you schedule that appointment, it pays to ask a few questions. The last thing you want is to be in the dark about any shop, plus it’ll keep you from making the wrong decisions about who to turn to for window tinting. Here are a few important questions you should ask your shop and yourself before having your windows tinted:

  • How many cars does the shop tint? If the shop tints a lot of cars on a regular basis, chances are the people working there know their stuff. But keep in mind that high volume doesn’t always mean quality service.
  • How long does it usually take? The time a shop takes to tint an entire car varies depending on the type of film used, the type of car, amount of window surface area and a variety of other variables. In short, it usually takes anywhere from an hour-and-a-half to two hours for an ordinary sedan and three hours or more for SUVs, coupes and other cars with unique and complex window designs.  If old tint has to be removed it could add several more hours of time.
  • Can you see examples of the shop’s work? Any professional shop will be proud to show you the fruits of their labor, so you can have an idea of what the end result might look like for your vehicle. If a shop refuses outright, you might want to reconsider giving them your business.
  • What are the local laws? Car window tinting laws vary between states, so what may be legal in one may not be in the other. Any reputable shop should have knowledge of the latest state tint laws. To avoid legal troubles down the road, always double-check the statutes yourself before having your window tint installed.
  • What is the shop’s guarantee? Many shops will offer a warranty on their installation. This usually covers bubbling, peeling and other flaws that come from mistakes during installation. Some shops offer five-year warranties, while others guarantee their work for the life of the vehicle.  
  • What brand and type tinting does the price include? Budget tint jobs under $100 are bound to have low-cost brands and types of tint, while high-end tint jobs around the $300 to $450 range usually include the best available tint. Always check the brand and type of tint before any car window tinting work begins. Don’t forget to learn about the warranty for the tint offered.
  • How does the shop finish the top edge of roll down windows? Is there a gap, or no gap? Some shops will leave a small gap or a micro-edge at the top edge of the roll down windows. Other shops will apply tint up to the edge of the glass, but this takes longer and involves more skill on the installer’s part. If you don’t want any gaps whatsoever, you might want to go the extra mile and ask for the latter or find a shop that’s willing to do the latter.  Keep in mind this takes extra time so it will likely cost more.
  • Will the rear window be installed in one piece? In most cases, rear window tint gets installed in one piece. It’s a tough task, but any professional shop will be able to get it done without any issues. Only in a few select cases (like dealing with compound curves or aftermarket defrost lines) will installers add rear window tint in several strips.
  • What happens in the dot matrix area on the back window? Most cars feature a black ceramic dot matrix edge that makes it harder for tint film to adhere to the area. Some shops may take the easy way out and simply leave a noticeable gap between the rest of the window and the dot matrix area. A professional shop offering quality tint installation will usually sand away the dot matrix before applying the tint or cover the area with flat black paint.

The Bottom Line

Any professional car window tinting shop should be more than willing to answer just about any question you have about their services, craftsmanship and warranties. If you feel like you're not getting the answers you want or if the shop is clearly not up to par, don't hesitate to walk away. You can always find another car window tinting shop that's willing to treat both your vehicle and your wallet the right way. 

By: Chris Ripper

 
 
 

Window Tint Terms in Plain English

Feb 3 2014

Chux Window Tinting Store

You've decided that tinting the windows of your ride is the way to go for looks and added protection and now you're looking into the different types available.  You start reading and soon you're scratching your head and wondering what the hell all these window tinting terms mean.  Look no further!  This glossary of terms puts things in plain English.

Visible Light Transmitted (VLT): This is the percentage of light you can see (not UV rays) that passes through the glass after tint is applied. To make it really simple, the lower the VLT number, the darker your tint will be.

Visible Light Reflected (VLR): Think of a mirror.  The higher the percentage on this one, the shinier the surface of the window tinting will appear.  Regular glass reflects between 8-10% of visible light, to give you a reference point.

Ultra Violet (UV) Block: UV rays are the rays you can't see, the ones that damage the interior of your vehicle and your skin.  You definitely want a high rating here.

Emissivity: Fancy word for the amount of heat from the sun that is reflected or absorbed by the tinting.  Think blistering hot seat belts on a hot summer day.  You want a lower number here.

U-Factor: The amount of heat transferred from where it's hotter, to where it's cooler. It's the same idea as the R-Factor for insulating your house.  The lower the number, the better it insulates.

Shading Coefficient: This number compares the window tint's gain in solar heat compared to glass with no protection.  All you need to know here is the lower the number, the better the window tinting will manage heat.

Solar Heat Gain Coefficient or G Value: Tells you the total amount of solar heat that will get into your vehicle with the reflection and absorption properties of the film.

Total Solar Energy Rejected: The total percentage of the sun's energy that is kept out of your vehicle by the tint.  You want a higher number here.

There are three terms in window tinting that work together to make up a percentage of 100 so we'll group them together:

Total Solar Energy Reflected: The percentage of the sun's energy that will be reflected away from your truck.

Total Solar Energy Transmitted: The percentage of the sun's energy that will still come through the tint film.

Total Solar Energy Absorbed: The percentage of the sun's energy that the film actually absorbs instead of reflecting or transmitting it.  If you are not having your window tinting installed professionally, keep this number below 50% to prevent window breakage.

There you have it.  The terms sound like they could be a whole other language but broken down they're not so bad.  The main thing is to know whether you want high numbers, or low numbers when you choose your tinting. 

Keep this glossary handy when you're shopping around and you'll not only sound like a pro when you order your tinting, you'll be able to pick out the best option for your ride.  Don't forget to check with the pros at Chux Trux for your window tinting needs!

 

By: Chris Ripper

 
 
 

Questions You Should Ask a Window Tinting Shop

Feb 3 2014

Chux Window Tint Shop

Finding a reputable shop is one of the most important aspects of car window tinting. After all, you want one that’s capable of getting the job done right the first time. When it comes to professionally applied window tint, the last thing you want is to save $20 going with the cheapest guys in town, only to end up with a botched job that takes time, effort and money to have corrected. It all comes down to asking your tint shop the right questions before making a final decision.  

Questions to Ask:

Before you schedule that appointment, it pays to ask a few questions. The last thing you want is to be in the dark about any shop, plus it’ll keep you from making the wrong decisions about who to turn to for window tinting. Here are a few important questions you should ask your shop and yourself before having your windows tinted:

  • How many cars does the shop tint? If the shop tints a lot of cars on a regular basis, chances are the people working there know their stuff. But keep in mind that high volume doesn’t always mean quality service.
  • How long does it usually take? The time a shop takes to tint an entire car varies depending on the type of film used, the type of car, amount of window surface area and a variety of other variables. In short, it usually takes anywhere from an hour-and-a-half to two hours for an ordinary sedan and three hours or more for SUVs, coupes and other cars with unique and complex window designs.  If old tint has to be removed it could add several more hours of time.
  • Can you see examples of the shop’s work? Any professional shop will be proud to show you the fruits of their labor, so you can have an idea of what the end result might look like for your vehicle. If a shop refuses outright, you might want to reconsider giving them your business.
  • What are the local laws? Car window tinting laws vary between states, so what may be legal in one may not be in the other. Any reputable shop should have knowledge of the latest state tint laws. To avoid legal troubles down the road, always double-check the statutes yourself before having your window tint installed.
  • What is the shop’s guarantee? Many shops will offer a warranty on their installation. This usually covers bubbling, peeling and other flaws that come from mistakes during installation. Some shops offer five-year warranties, while others guarantee their work for the life of the vehicle.  
  • What brand and type tinting does the price include? Budget tint jobs under $100 are bound to have low-cost brands and types of tint, while high-end tint jobs around the $300 to $450 range usually include the best available tint. Always check the brand and type of tint before any car window tinting work begins. Don’t forget to learn about the warranty for the tint offered.
  • How does the shop finish the top edge of roll down windows? Is there a gap, or no gap? Some shops will leave a small gap or a micro-edge at the top edge of the roll down windows. Other shops will apply tint up to the edge of the glass, but this takes longer and involves more skill on the installer’s part. If you don’t want any gaps whatsoever, you might want to go the extra mile and ask for the latter or find a shop that’s willing to do the latter.  Keep in mind this takes extra time so it will likely cost more.
  • Will the rear window be installed in one piece? In most cases, rear window tint gets installed in one piece. It’s a tough task, but any professional shop will be able to get it done without any issues. Only in a few select cases (like dealing with compound curves or aftermarket defrost lines) will installers add rear window tint in several strips.
  • What happens in the dot matrix area on the back window? Most cars feature a black ceramic dot matrix edge that makes it harder for tint film to adhere to the area. Some shops may take the easy way out and simply leave a noticeable gap between the rest of the window and the dot matrix area. A professional shop offering quality tint installation will usually sand away the dot matrix before applying the tint or cover the area with flat black paint.

The Bottom Line

Any professional car window tinting shop should be more than willing to answer just about any question you have about their services, craftsmanship and warranties. If you feel like you're not getting the answers you want or if the shop is clearly not up to par, don't hesitate to walk away. Better yet, call our experts at the Chux Tint ShopYou can always find another car window tinting shop that's willing to treat both your vehicle and your wallet the right way. 

By: Chris Ripper

 
 
 

Cleaning Tinted Windows

Aug 6 2013

Cleaning Tinted Windows by Chris Ripper

Cleaning tinted windowsCar window tinting is an awesome way to make your truck stand out from the crowd and has a lot of added benefits like reduced interior heat and sun protection.  Once you get your truck's windows tinted though, there are some tips that will help make sure your tinting lasts a lifetime and keeps looking hot.

Tinting film is very thin and applied with a soap and water solution to your truck's windows.  Once the film is on the window, technicians use squeegees and other tools to smooth it onto the surface of your window.  Since it's a wet application, there is curing time involved.  It's recommended that you don't touch roll your windows down for a minimum of 48 hours if the weather is hot and sunny.  If the conditions are more like Spring or Fall, then you should avoid touching or rolling down the newly applied tinting for the first five days after it's been applied.  Complete curing of the car window tinting takes up to 30 to 45 days.

In the first few days after getting your windows done, you might be tempted to break out the window cleaner because you may see streaks and a foggy appearance.  Resist the urge!  This is a natural thing as the tint film cures and adheres itself tightly to your glass.  The window film generally isn't cleaned after installation because it's so sensitive before it's cured.  The film should clear up mostly on its own as the curing process advances.  

Another issue you might see during the beginning of the curing process is small water pockets in the car window tinting.  Small bubbles are normal as the droplets of water will evaporate and the film will shrink against the glass.  If the pockets are larger than the size of a dime, you should return to where you had the tint applied and seek their advice.  In most cases however, the water will evaporate with exposure to the sun and the bubbles will disappear within a few days.

Once you've waited out the five days, you can clean your windows with a soft cloth and an ammonia free cleaner.  Stay away from the blue glass cleaners, they generally have ammonia in them, and this can react with your car window tinting and cause permanent streaks or blotches.  Stick with cleaners that are made with vinegar or citrus, or get the ones made specifically for tinted windows.  Make sure you always use a soft cloth and stay away from the harsher paper towels or other abrasive products as they can scratch your tinting.

Even though the film becomes fairly durable once it's cured, you'll still have to be careful not to hit it with sharp objects or rub against it.  Nothing looks worse than having great, dark tinted windows with a big old scratch on a window from a box that you were loading that jammed against your car window or a flyaway seat belt!  Speaking of seat belts, did you know that seat belts are the #1 cause of damage to window tint?  Next time you are a passenger in a car, watch the driver unhook their seat belt and see if it hits the door or window.   Be extra careful with any type of hard or sharp object near your window film.

Stickers, decals and suction cup type holders are definite things to keep away from your tinted windows.  Any of these can damage the surface of your window film and cause ugly looking blotches.  If for whatever reason you end up with adhesive residue on your window film, use a bit of acetone VERY sparingly to remove it.  NEVER use a razor blade to try to remove any type of adhesive product from your car window tinting as this will likely cause severe damage.

Finally, a little known but important fact to consider.  Over time, the gasket that surrounds your truck windows when you raise and lower them can become coated in dirt particles that might scratch the surface of your windows, and especially your tint film.  If you're a handy sort of guy, you should consider cleaning the tracks and gaskets at least once a year to keep them as dirt free as possible.  This will really improve the lifespan of your tinting job and keep it looking newer, longer.

Car window tinting does mean you have to put a bit more effort when cleaning and caring for your windows, but the great looks and the added protection for your truck make it totally worth your effort! And if you ever have questions about window tint or anything else, give our experts a call at Chux Trux.  We're here to help.

 

By: Chris Ripper